Bristol Doors Open Days

Bristol Doors Open Days
The Merchants’ Hall
indocilis pauperiem pati
‘One who cannot learn to bear poverty’

What did I learn about our ‘Island Story’
On a squally September rain-swept day,
At the Merchants’ Hall, and Redcliffe Caves?
Well, we formed an orderly queue at the Hall,
Bantering with the pinstriped beadle,
Before our guide escorted us to the hall,
Where our talk began.

It was informative, in a manner of speaking:
The chandeliers are cleaned every two years!
Sixty-eight people can sit at this table!
When a speaker addresses an audience here,
The chairs are moved to face the front!
Princess Anne likes the Merchant Venturers!
Here are pictures of the docks in the 18th century!
(No mention yet…)
Royal Charters galore!
Portraits galore!
One day there will be a woman on the wall!
And a female ‘Master’ of the Society,
And she shalt have the title of ‘Master’!
The voice went on about the Society’s charitable enterprises,
I glanced at a couple of their annual reports:
‘New Schools’ Trust Offers Diversity’
(Conventional trope of girl in a science lab.),
More stuff on academies, residential care for the elderly,
‘Social business’ (sic), almshouses,
The ownership of Clifton Downs,
‘Although some 460 years old, the Society
is fresh and full of vigour and purpose’;
‘ … The Society and Bristol prospered. Trading patterns changed
over the centuries, with the later years marked
by the appalling period of slave trading in the 18th century.’
It all felt a bit Kafkaesque,
An arcane, shadowy world of ruling class disinformation …
Where philanthropy and charity
Obscures the hierarchy of ruling class control…

Bristol Doors Open Days
The Merchants’ Hall
indocilis pauperiem pati
‘One who cannot learn to bear poverty’

What did I learn about our ‘Island Story’
On a squally September rain-swept day,
At the Merchants’ Hall, and Redcliffe Caves?
Well, we formed an orderly queue at the Hall,
Bantering with the pinstriped beadle,
Before our guide escorted us to the hall,
Where our talk began.

It was informative, in a manner of speaking:
The chandeliers are cleaned every two years!
Sixty-eight people can sit at this table!
When a speaker addresses an audience here,
The chairs are moved to face the front!
Princess Anne likes the Merchant Venturers!
Here are pictures of the docks in the 18th century!
(No mention yet…)
Royal Charters galore!
Portraits galore!
One day there will be a woman on the wall!
And a female ‘Master’ of the Society,
And she shalt have the title of ‘Master’!
The voice went on about the Society’s charitable enterprises,
I glanced at a couple of their annual reports:
‘New Schools’ Trust Offers Diversity’
(Conventional trope of girl in a science lab.),
More stuff on academies, residential care for the elderly,
‘Social business’ (sic), almshouses,
The ownership of Clifton Downs,
‘Although some 460 years old, the Society
is fresh and full of vigour and purpose’;
‘ … The Society and Bristol prospered. Trading patterns changed
over the centuries, with the later years marked
by the appalling period of slave trading in the 18th century.’
It all felt a bit Kafkaesque,
An arcane, shadowy world of ruling class disinformation …
Where philanthropy and charity
Obscures the hierarchy of ruling class control…

read more

A Literary, Self-referential, Post-modernist Pub Crawl

Announcing a Literary, Self-Referential, Post-Modernist Pub Crawl on Thursday – starting at The Fountain at 4.

The Fountain – The Vic – The Greyhound – The Imperial – The Lord John – The Little George.

Announcing a Literary, Self-Referential, Post-Modernist Pub Crawl on Thursday - starting at The Fountain at 4.

The Fountain - The Vic - The Greyhound - The Imperial - The Lord John - The Little George. read more

Thirty Something Local Historic Reasons to Vote for David Drew

Thirty Local Historic Reasons to Vote for David Drew and Keep the Tories Out

Remember:

1. The Diggers and their Slimbridge Civil War community and those who supported them in Stroud and the Five Valleys
2. The Parliamentarians imprisoned in Painswick Church
3. The growers of Nicotiana Rustica who defied both King and Cromwell
4. Those who took direct action for a ‘moral economy’ against high food prices in Stroud and the Five Valleys
5. Those cloth-workers who took direct action against low wages and long hours in Stroud and the Five Valleys
6. Those who opposed slavery
7. Those who took direct action against the game laws
8. Those who opposed enclosure
9. Those who took direct action against turnpike tolls
10. Those who were transported

Thirty Local Historic Reasons to Vote for David Drew and Keep the Tories Out

Remember:

1. The Diggers and their Slimbridge Civil War community and those who supported them in Stroud and the Five Valleys
2. The Parliamentarians imprisoned in Painswick Church
3. The growers of Nicotiana Rustica who defied both King and Cromwell
4. Those who took direct action for a ‘moral economy’ against high food prices in Stroud and the Five Valleys
5. Those cloth-workers who took direct action against low wages and long hours in Stroud and the Five Valleys
6. Those who opposed slavery
7. Those who took direct action against the game laws
8. Those who opposed enclosure
9. Those who took direct action against turnpike tolls
10. Those who were transported read more

Save The Sub-Rooms!

‘In short, sir, you have it in a nutshell.
Where would Stroud be without it?’

We live in such divided times that anything that unites us is to be admired,
And just as a nation can be divided, so a town can be divided in so many ways:
Hefts can build up based on social class, or ethnicity, or politics, or education,
Or for so many whatever varied reasons,
As people find and accentuate commonality,
And whilst Stroud and the Five Valleys is not exactly ‘Town and Gown’,
It can feel a bit like Disraeli’s Two Nations at times:

‘Two nations between whom there is no intercourse and no sympathy; who are as ignorant of each other’s habits, thoughts, and feelings, as if they were dwellers in different zones, or inhabitants of different planets.’

'In short, sir, you have it in a nutshell.
Where would Stroud be without it?'

We live in such divided times that anything that unites us is to be admired,
And just as a nation can be divided, so a town can be divided in so many ways:
Hefts can build up based on social class, or ethnicity, or politics, or education,
Or for so many whatever varied reasons,
As people find and accentuate commonality,
And whilst Stroud and the Five Valleys is not exactly 'Town and Gown',
It can feel a bit like Disraeli's Two Nations at times:

'Two nations between whom there is no intercourse and no sympathy; who are as ignorant of each other's habits, thoughts, and feelings, as if they were dwellers in different zones, or inhabitants of different planets.'

read more

Nailsworth Shoddy

I often walk the cycle track at the bottom of Rodborough Hill,
The old Midland Railway spur from Dudbridge into Stroud,
And I often cycle the track on to Nailsworth through Woodchester,
Musing on the springs and watercourses, the ancient holloways,
The Roman villa, medieval ridge and furrow, the woollen mills,
The occasional mill chimney, still rising high into the Stroudwater sky,
And I have often walked the surrounds of Avening, Minch and Amberley,
Recreating the 1916 tragedy of Dorothy Beard and Archibald Knee,
A young woman and a young new recruit,
Drowning together in a millpond.

In short, my head is usually lost in the clouds of the past,
Where I am entranced rather than perturbed by novelty –
Unlike Scrooge, I see few phantoms that repel –
Until last night, when just before our show
Trenchcoats for Goalposts,
At the Comrades’ Club,
In Nailsworth,
Jon Seagrave mentioned a local radio history programme
About that local branch line and the First World War,
Did I know that? …

I often walk the cycle track at the bottom of Rodborough Hill,
The old Midland Railway spur from Dudbridge into Stroud,
And I often cycle the track on to Nailsworth through Woodchester,
Musing on the springs and watercourses, the ancient holloways,
The Roman villa, medieval ridge and furrow, the woollen mills,
The occasional mill chimney, still rising high into the Stroudwater sky,
And I have often walked the surrounds of Avening, Minch and Amberley,
Recreating the 1916 tragedy of Dorothy Beard and Archibald Knee,
A young woman and a young new recruit,
Drowning together in a millpond.

In short, my head is usually lost in the clouds of the past,
Where I am entranced rather than perturbed by novelty -
Unlike Scrooge, I see few phantoms that repel –
Until last night, when just before our show
Trenchcoats for Goalposts,
At the Comrades’ Club,
In Nailsworth,
Jon Seagrave mentioned a local radio history programme
About that local branch line and the First World War,
Did I know that? …

read more

Saturday November 26th 1pm Stroud Brewery: A Chartist Walk with a Porter

A performative walk starting at Stroud Brewery to christen the new Chartist porter. The walk will commence at the Brewery, with explanation, contextualisation and performance; then wend its way along the canal to Wallbridge and then along the old railway line to Dudbridge. We will then climb up to the Bell for more porter and thence to the top of Selsley Hill. The walk will be interspersed with performance, bringing the local and national Chartists to life in the landscape. Walkers make their own way back to wherever they wish to go: that’s the Chartists’ seventh point. We should be finished on Selsley by 4pm.

A performative walk starting at Stroud Brewery to christen the new Chartist porter. The walk will commence at the Brewery, with explanation, contextualisation and performance; then wend its way along the canal to Wallbridge and then along the old railway line to Dudbridge. We will then climb up to the Bell for more porter and thence to the top of Selsley Hill. The walk will be interspersed with performance, bringing the local and national Chartists to life in the landscape. Walkers make their own way back to wherever they wish to go: that's the Chartists' seventh point. We should be finished on Selsley by 4pm.
read more

Hidden Stroud Walks

Announcing two new walks in collaboration with the Hidden Stroud project this weekend:

Stroud History Reimagined

The walk will reimagine the history of Stroud, touching upon springs, streams and weavers; radical canal history, Stroud Scarlet, slavery and the Black Atlantic.

A walk for anyone interested in walking, history, literature and an imaginative blurring of genres.

http://www.subscriptionrooms.org.uk/whats-on/stroud-history-reimagined-with-stuart-butler/

https://www.facebook.com/events/340825872919858/

For ages 14+
08 October 2016
Start times: 10:00-13:00
Tickets: £2 donation on the day
Box office: 01453 760900

A History of Radical Stroud

A performative walk from the front of the Subscription Rooms, up to Rodborough Common along the Frome, re-imagining the history of Stroud by looking at the Captain Swing Riots in Gloucestershire; Chartism in Stroud and the Five Valleys; the relevance of John Clare to our landscape and history, and then down to The Prince Albert.

A walk for anyone interested in walking, history, literature and an imaginative blurring of genres.

http://www.subscriptionrooms.org.uk/whats-on/a-history-of-radical-stroud-with-stuart-butler/

https://www.facebook.com/events/1770295653243313/

For ages 14+
08 October 2016
Start times: 14:30-16:30
Tickets: £2 donation on the day
Box office: 01453 760900

Announcing two new walks in collaboration with the Hidden Stroud project this weekend:

Stroud History Reimagined

The walk will reimagine the history of Stroud, touching upon springs, streams and weavers; radical canal history, Stroud Scarlet, slavery and the Black Atlantic.

A walk for anyone interested in walking, history, literature and an imaginative blurring of genres.

http://www.subscriptionrooms.org.uk/whats-on/stroud-history-reimagined-with-stuart-butler/

https://www.facebook.com/events/340825872919858/

For ages 14+
08 October 2016
Start times: 10:00-13:00
Tickets: £2 donation on the day
Box office: 01453 760900

A History of Radical Stroud

A performative walk from the front of the Subscription Rooms, up to Rodborough Common along the Frome, re-imagining the history of Stroud by looking at the Captain Swing Riots in Gloucestershire; Chartism in Stroud and the Five Valleys; the relevance of John Clare to our landscape and history, and then down to The Prince Albert.

A walk for anyone interested in walking, history, literature and an imaginative blurring of genres.

http://www.subscriptionrooms.org.uk/whats-on/a-history-of-radical-stroud-with-stuart-butler/

https://www.facebook.com/events/1770295653243313/

For ages 14+
08 October 2016
Start times: 14:30-16:30
Tickets: £2 donation on the day
Box office: 01453 760900 read more

Radical History Weavers and Workhouse Walk: August 27th 4-6PM

WEAVERS and WORKHOUSE WALK

Saturday August 27th 4 of the afternoone clocke , startinge at Ye Ale House:

INFORM – EDUCATE – ENTERTAIN

Stuart Butler will lead a performative walk through the 18th and 19th centuries, meeting atte Ye ALE House: time for a 4pm drink and a chat about Chartism and the workhouse at the top of town. Then a walk thence, via a history of riots, anonymous letters, mass meetings, strikes, slave owners and the Black Atlantic.

The tour will then reach the cemetery where Angela Findlay, resident of the Cemetery Gate Lodge and artist of the 2009 installations Re-dressing Absence, will lead a stroll around the cemetery to reveal the history of the workhouse and the paupers’ graves.

Visit Angela’s Website by clicking here.

The walk will finish by 6pm, leaving you lots of time for getting ready to go out again.

WEAVERS and WORKHOUSE WALK

Saturday August 27th 4 of the afternoone clocke , startinge at Ye Ale House:

INFORM – EDUCATE - ENTERTAIN

Stuart Butler will lead a performative walk through the 18th and 19th centuries, meeting atte Ye ALE House: time for a 4pm drink and a chat about Chartism and the workhouse at the top of town. Then a walk thence, via a history of riots, anonymous letters, mass meetings, strikes, slave owners and the Black Atlantic.

The tour will then reach the cemetery where Angela Findlay, resident of the Cemetery Gate Lodge and artist of the 2009 installations Re-dressing Absence, will lead a stroll around the cemetery to reveal the history of the workhouse and the paupers’ graves.

Visit Angela's Website by clicking here.

The walk will finish by 6pm, leaving you lots of time for getting ready to go out again. read more

Find Another Bath Project and Walk

A message from Richard White:

Greetings Walkers and Supporters.
A first Sunday walkout for August!
Hope you can join me on foot or online.
Sunday 7 August 10.00
Meet outside 44 AD Gallery, 4 Abbey St, Bath BA1 1NN
http://www.walknowtracks.co.uk/walks.html
A photo walk as a contribution to the Find Another Bath project. I want to gather images of the plaqued and unplaqued homes, visitors and residents of Bath, with a special interest in exploring the legacies of slave ownership. Part of the walk will take place along the National Trust’s Walk to the View and I hope we will find and share other views as we go.
Much of the walk will be in the City but we will finish in the fields overlooking the Abbey and the view west. The walk goes ahead regardless of the weather , I’ll do a second email shot nearer the date.
I am very keen to discuss with you a cycle of walks based on this past few months work and building on the fringe walks. The walk on Sunday will be a contribution to the Find Another Bath project and I really hope that together we can capture images and sounds for future exhibition. When we start asking questions about the obscured heritage of Bath, thinking the difficult thoughts of legacy, where does it take us? In the hurly burly summer season city can we find another Bath. Is it hiding in plain sight?
Maybe on Sunday 7 August we will capture a few glimpses of that other Bath.
Please join me on foot or online! Let me know if you can be there and do share this widely.
best wishes
Richard


Richard White
mob: 07717012790
tw: @walknowlive
web: www.walknowtracks.co.uk